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Moline Cross

More symbolic than practical, the Moline Cross has several interpretations

Moline Cross

and Anchory Cross

Croix Fourche

The Moline Cross is a type of Forked Cross with prongs terminating each of the four arms. Like the Armenian Cross and St. John's Cross, the four double-tipped arms create eight points which remind us of the eight beatitudes. 

In heraldry, the cross is known as Croix Fourche or Fourchetée (French) or Crux Furca (Latin). Another heraldic term is Croix Anillée or Croix Nillée (French).

Croix Ancree
Croix
Ancrée

When these double-tips are exaggerated to curve back on themselves like anchors, they are known as Anchory (Fr: Ancrée). Alternatively they might be viewed as Fish Hooks (Fr: Hameçons). Similar crosses include the Avellan Cross, Crampon Cross, Hooked Cross and the Russian Baron's Cross.

The term 'Moline' ('Millrine' or 'Millrind') comes from the Latin molere 'to grind' and molinum 'mill'. This is because the shape of this cross is similar to the iron bar (rind) that supports or secures a millstone. Occasionally the cross is called a Millstone Cross or Miller's Cross.

Diocese of Trenton
Diocese of Trenton
Methodist Church Ghana
Methodist Church Ghana

Maronite Church
(Click to enlarge)

Examples are seen in the emblems of

Interpretations

We can relate the Miller's Cross to John 6:35, 48-58: "Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life" - manna from heaven and spiritual nourishment, which Christ gave through His sacrifice on the cross.

An Anchor is a life saver, since it can prevent a ship from crashing on to rocks. For Christians, the analogy is that Christ can save spiritual lives. The nautical image of an anchor gives the idea of navigation (through life).

As a Fish Hook Cross, reference can be made to the Christian duty to be fishers of men for Jesus (see Jesus Fish Cross).

Beatitude: One of the eight sayings at the beginning of Jesus' very first sermon - the Sermon on the Mount. In Latin each saying begins with beatus (blessed) and they are listed in Matt. 5:3-11.

"I am the bread of life" is one of the Seven I AM's of Jesus.

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