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Coloured Crosses

When a colour is applied to a cross, the form is usually a basic Latin or Greek cross. The form bears no particular significance - simply easy to draw, easy to recognise, and doesn't detract the eye from the additional message given by the colour. When we see a red cross for example, we see either the colour red, or we see a sign of the humanitarian organisation. What we don't see, is a cross.

Coloured crosses are used for many different purposes and organisations. The Orange Cross for example, is used by several commercial ambulances and healthcare providers, and also political groups.

Often these are seen as Lapel Pins. We haven't attempted to explain all the uses for each cross; the choice for thw description given has been selected quite arbitrarily.

Neither do we include all the crosses that happen to be coloured; shown here are only the crosses that have particular significance because of their colour. (See also the symbolism of Liturgical Colours)

Mouse over a cross for its name
Click on a cross for its details

The Black Death Cross Orange Cross - with significant political overtones Yellow or Golden Cross. A macabre cross. Daffodil yellow St. David's Cross Green Cross, representing First Aid and Safety Green Cross, representing First Aid and Safety Lazarus's Cross, similar to Hospitallers' Green Cross Blue Cross and the blue-hair-rinse brigade Purple Cross for royalty, spirituality and animals Where colour is not important, black is most common Voided or White Cross Rainbow Cross Mosaic Cross. A colourful teaching aid. Rope Cross. A colourful teaching aid. The heraldic Gyronny Cross Old Glory Cross; for proud, patriotic Christians AIDS Awareness Campaign Deacon sash divine mercy Rainbow

Mouse over a cross for its name
Click on a cross for its details

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